The “Patricia” Shawl

A classic colour combination, with a bit of sassy bling for the holiday time.  This shawl is 74” x 30” and made of luscious merino woven onto a merino/cotton warp.

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The “Helene” Blanket

I’ve added this to the Blanket and Home Goods page already, but I love this thing so much I had to give it its own post. This is the “Helene” Blanket. A moody mix of purples, green, blue and a dash of pink. Mysterious, happy, comforting. It’s plain weave, which I love. It is underrated as a draft, but sometimes you just want to let the fibre and colour do the talking for you, you know?

This is one of those times when I wish I could keep what I make, but it was a commission and I have to let it go.

It’s 100% merino wool from Mineville Wool Project, three different kinds: a lovely 4 ply, a dk weight, and a 1 ply chunky.  All of it lovely, all of it machine washable. All of it soft and velvety, cool to the touch but so warm in a blanket. The piece itself 40″ x 88″ with fringe – more than wide and long enough to binge-watch a whole lot of Dr. Who, Game of Thrones, and Marvel superhero movies with one’s sweetie.

Midline, the Helene

Midline, the Helene

I don’t usually let the cat do this - the blanket is for a cat-lover so I let her do it this once.

I don’t usually let the cat do this – the blanket is for a cat-lover so I let her do it this once.

Soft, warm, and cozy.

Soft, warm, and cozy.

Random stripes of colour warp, and weft with vareigated purples in two different weights

Random stripes of colour warp, and weft with vareigated purples in two different weights

Then, and Now.

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This lovely skein of handspun comes from the Barrington Woolen Mill, part of the Nova Scotia Museum System. BWCo  just spent a wonderful few days visiting various museums along the south shore of Nova Scotia – of particular interest, of course,  were the old carding mills and woolen mills.  At the museum, the women who give the tours are also weaving and spinning, and selling their work. They were clearly, and rightfully, proud of what they were creating. We had a long talk about various ways to set up looms, and what they were spinning. They told us that when they started working there they didn’t know how to weave or spin, and had taught themselves, essentially.

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Barrington Woolen Mill Museum, Barrington NS

Later on our way, we happened along a more modern-day wool processer in Yarmouth, and were given a wonderful tour. It’s such a joy to see these industries still working today. Thank you, Yarnsmith Fibreworks Inc.​ for your generously given time.  Along with the other fibre processors in Nova Scotia, you are helping to keep a tradition alive.

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